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Julie C

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Posts posted by Julie C


  1. On 11/26/2018 at 8:54 PM, Sharon Tiano said:

    @Julie C - YAY... I am so happy you got her back.  She looks good.  So, hard case? Check.  Bubble wrap? Check.  LOL    I am sure she is as glad to be home as your are to have her home.  Can't wait to hear you play and SING together ❤️

    Apparently it is a fall forward that is most likely to result in a break.  Doesn't take much of a jolt with all the tension on the head to begin with.

    • Like 4

  2. 13 hours ago, Pamski said:

    I figure I'm an alto as well, and everything you described resonated. Been thinking for over a year to get help figuring it out, so your post is really inspirational. Can't wait to hear more about your progress and hopefully hear a sample one of these days. You go girl!!

    @Pamski I didn't even have the full range of an alto when I started. Middle C is "C4".  Low c is "C3". High C is "C5". My range was F3 to F4.  And the F3 and F4 was shaky.  Less than an octave range.  I now have over a 2 octave range.  Getting those sounds my voice has never had to produce to sound good will take time.  It feels somewhat unnatural to hear these sounds come from me.  I nail it sometimes.  But not most times-yet.  Even a few lessons can point you in the right direction.

    • Like 1

  3. UPDATE: I have now had a couple of months of singing lessons.  Soooooo nice being a professional videographer.  Been able to barter services:-)My voice continues to surprise me as the high notes come easier and easier.  Seems learning to sing is endless tweaking.  I have spent my life singing in my speaking voice. Tweaks were very big in the beginning.  You should be standing and standing up straight.  You need to learn to use your air.  Need a nice steady stream to produce good tone.  Then the tweaks get smaller. Need to raise your pallet. Need to work on  resonance.  Sometimes it is your chest that is resonating.  Sometimes the resonation can be felt in your teeth. Or nose.  Supposed to be able to feel certain notes in your eyes.  Hasn't happened. Yet.  There is a transition point in your voice between registers--like when going from mixed voice to head voice.  These transitions are called passagios.  Learning to go up the scale without sounding like a boy whose voice is changing at the passagio is interesting.  And singing is a head voice is still a totally new sensation.  Reading music has been a big help.  I know when I hit a high c that is where my passagio lies and need to push into head voice to continue with any notes above high c.   Chin position matters.  Tongue position matters.  You need to place the sound forward in your mouth for the best resonance rather than singing from your throat.  And somehow you one day have to be able to do it all without thinking about it.  And without  singing along with another voice to keep you on pitch.  Best of all it has been the missing piece of my guitar experience.  It completes the experience.  There are many singing lessons online.  But nothing has compared to a teacher tweaking and tweaking.  It will be awhile before I "can sing".  I started out with a very rough limited voice.  But I know I will!  Even a couple of lessons from a good teacher can get you on the right track.  A great way to start developing that air flow is doing lip trills.  Here is an example. There are tons of lip other trill videos out there. 

     

    • Like 2

  4. 13 hours ago, Brian Santos said:

    WOW, Julie--I am so happy for you! Those are great tips, thank you! I'll try to remember them. Keep up the good work. I love your enthusiasm!

    @Brian Santos I have long felt not being able to sing impacted my guitar playing.  I always loved the sound of an acoustic guitar player singing.  As much as I love the guitar, part of what I love about it was missing.  No one can tell what you are trying to play just by hearing a bunch of chords strumming.  It will take a while before I can do both.  But now I know I actually will be able to one day.  It is a good feeling!


  5. 14 hours ago, Lin said:

    Hi Julie,  Such an amazing adventure. I hope you are following his lead and collecting your own progression videos. Get all those small wins on tape. I had no idea about all this. I guess I always thought you pretty much had to be born with a good voice and then practiced to make it better.  

    Thank you      Lin

    I always thought you were born either being able to sing or not also @Lin.   I have pondered my inability to sing for years.  I didn't expect there were so many things that make a difference in how you sound.  I am guessing there are so many more I haven't even touched on yet.  This teacher seems to focus each week on the one thing I am bot doing that would make the biggest difference.  First week it was yawning to feel the soft pallet raise and produce sounds in my range at the time in a mixed voice.  Second week it was doing things to increase that range up and down and control where those low notes and high notes can come from.  Feeling and understanding and hearing what head voice is versus chest voice. Third week she added lip trills to increase range and control and sustain airflow.  Last week it was keeping my tongue in the proper position.  Lip trills are hard for me.  Here is an example of a lip trill warm up in my range-alto.  I cannot do them while driving.  Makes me dizzy!

     

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